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After experimenting with nuno felting, I wanted to create these fiber strips that were a bit more sturdy, seeing as viewers would be touching them and moving their bodies between them. I don’t want to fibers to stick or to be pulled by the bodies. They should be sturdy and enable a touch, without completely surrendering its position.

Seeing as I have loads of white wool fibers in my studio, I considered knitting the wool roving. The wool roving isn’t felted nor is it spun into yarn. There is something about working with raw materials that draws me in…something about their essential elements. We are often so separate from materials that we forget how they come into being. Food is a great example. Yet, I digress….

I began by splitting the wool roving so that the fibers wouldn’t be quite so thick.

And then rolling those fibers into balls to knit. I was careful to weight the individual balls so that any change in material could be more gradual than abrupt.

Here’s a batch lining up for duty.

After that, I started experimenting with circular knitting. It’s quite straight forward (perfect for newbies). The initial forms it created I found to be beautiful. Sort of like a coral growth.

Since I was new to knitting at this point, it took me a minute to understand the affect of needle cord length and size of needles. The length of cord was too long. I don’t want to have these massively wide pieces. People need to be able to move between these pieces, not to hide behind them. Hmmmm…..

So, I must revise this. I opted to take the work apart in order to make the most of my supplies.

Next round will be thinner in the tube width.

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